Newt and Texas – A Great Combination

I had the privilege of attending the TPPF Policy Orientation in January.  The event brought together politicians, ideologues of different persuasions, and everyday citizens like me.  One of my favorite speakers during the event was Newt Gingrich.  Whatever you think of his politics, he has some phenomenal ideas, and Texas and US leaders should be listening.  A few of his ideas are highlighted here.

“We should be energy independent at the end of the decade.”   One of the biggest topics at the Orientation was energy; specifically the impact of current development is having on Texas and its economy.   With discoveries like the Eagle Ford Shale providing tons of jobs and increased tax income for the state, Texas is only one state benefitting from new technologies to find oil and gas.  Across the US, oil field jobs are providing opportunities for new jobs and allowing states to build their “rainy day” funds.  The Obama administration should be touting this boon to the economy and job sector at every opportunity, discouraging our dependence on foreign oil.

“If you have buying power as a state, game developers should develop learning tools for children.” What a brilliant alliance that could be!  Game developers using their popularity among kids to actually create learning tools to help students gain valuable skills and help foster a future career?  Our educational leaders need to embrace what holds the attentions of kids and use it to their advantage.

“How do you incentivize people to break out of what they are? If you get unemployment, you have to take a course offered by a business. Don’t give people money for nothing.”  Getting people off welfare is a common theme of political campaigns, but you don’t hear too many ideas to make it happen.  If welfare recipients are required to take business courses, we could be developing a whole new group of future business owners.

“Look at disabilities. Design a capability-based program, not a disability program.”  We all too often focus on what a disabled person can’t do vs. what they can do. Developing opportunities for them to shine could change the look of our workforce.

“If a student graduates from high school in the 11th grade, give the value of 12th grade as a scholarship. They have the 1st step in going to school. We need a generation of that kind of creativity.” What a simple, yet brilliant use of education dollars. Give bright students a step up, making it easier to send them to college, and we encourage the next generation of leaders.

“Nobody suggested it was cheating for Johnny football to get the trophy.”  Let’s do away with the “everyone gets a ribbon” mentality and start awarding real achievement. Giving strong students the ability to move ahead rather than being held back by their less motivated peers will give the country a stronger edge in competing with the world.

“We hold in our hands the beginning of the future. What are all the ways we can create an America 2.0? We will be the movement and the party of a better future. Change the political map of America, letting them know we care about their future.”  The Republican Party needs a facelift and a serious public relations turnaround campaign.  They continue to let the Left define them as uncaring, all about the rich, and unwelcoming to minorities.  Those of us who identify as conservatives or Republicans know that isn’t true, but we need to find ways to get that message out with social media, repeated messaging, and using any means necessary to spread that message to minorities across the country.  Traditionally, Democrats have always been better at getting their message out, and we need to embrace their strategies to change the narrative.

Love him or hate him, one can’t deny Newt Gingrich has some fantastic ideas to get this country moving in a stronger direction.  Keep the dialogue open with your representatives on local and national levels.  Share your ideas, push them to look at untraditional methods, and let’s return America to its rightful place as a World Leader.

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2 Responses to Newt and Texas – A Great Combination

  1. Carleigh Townsend Partin says:

    Hi there, I cried when I read the post about your father. I was searching for an old newspaper article for my father to add to some family history. Although I didn’t find the article, I found your post. My father, too, was one of those teenage pranksters at the opening of “711 Ocean Drive” at the Majestic! I bookmarked your post and shared it with my father at Christmas. He was so amazed and excited to read your post. He knew exactly who you father was and enjoyed taking a trip down memory lane. He’s been telling that story since we were kids as well. It makes me laugh every time I hear it. You wouldn’t happen to have a copy of that article you could share with me would you? I would be so grateful! My father is Henry “Buddy” C. Townsend, Jr. He grew up on Cason street in West University and his grandfather (E. A. Moreno) was an editor of The Post for 60 years. His mother played the piano for the silent movies downtown, and she, her husband, and grandfather played music one night a week on a radio show in Houston.

    Thanks for sharing such a wonderful tribute. I was sorry to read of your dads passing. He was a true hero. Wishing you health, happiness, and a very Happy New Year!

    Warmest regards,
    Carleigh

    • texasslant says:

      Hi, this is DeAnn Irby. Your note gave me goosebumps! My aunt is Winifred Irby, and she gave me the article! I’ll have to find it. So great to get your note!!

      Sent from my iPhone

      >

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